Where Does The Money Go?

In a normal year, this page reflects how the NCAA’s revenue is distributed to support NCAA schools, conferences and nearly 500,000 student-athletes. However, the financial impact of the cancellation of the remaining NCAA winter and spring championships due to the COVID-19 public health crisis significantly changed the 2020 distributions to member schools. On Thursday, March 26, the NCAA Board of Governors voted on those specific changes.

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爱的交换The NCAA receives most of its annual revenue from two sources. That money is distributed in more than a dozen ways – almost all of which directly support NCAA schools, conferences and nearly half a million student-athletes.

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WHERE IT COMES FROM

Who It Supports

Student-athletes are at the heart of the NCAA’s mission.

HOW IT'S DISTRIBUTED

$222M
Sport Sponsorship and Scholarship Funds

Distributed to Division I schools to help fund NCAA sports and provide scholarships for college athletes.

$168.8M
Division I Basketball Performance Fund

Distributed to Division I conferences and independent schools based on their performance in the men’s basketball tournament over a six-year rolling period. The money is used to fund NCAA sports and provide scholarships for college athletes.

$153.8M
Division I Championships

Provides college athletes the opportunity to compete for a championship and includes support for team travel, food and lodging.

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$86.6M
Student Assistance Fund

爱的交换Distributed to Division I student-athletes for essential needs that arise during their time in college.

$64.5M
Student-Athlete Services and Championship Support

Includes funding for catastrophic injury insurance, drug testing, student-athlete leadership programs, postgraduate scholarships爱的交换 and additional Association-wide championships support.

$53.6M
Division I Equal Conference Fund

Distributed equally among Division I basketball-playing conferences that meet athletic and academic standards to play in the men's basketball tournament. The money is used to fund NCAA sports and provide scholarships for college athletes.

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$49.2M
Academic Enhancement Fund

爱的交换Distributed to Division I schools to assist with academic programs and services.

$53.3M
Division II Allocation**

爱的交换Funds championships, grants and other initiatives for Division II college athletes.

$23.3M
Membership Support Services

Covers costs related to NCAA?governance committees and the annual NCAA Convention.

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$35.2M
Division III Allocation**

爱的交换Funds championships, grants and other initiatives for Division III college athletes.

$10M
Division I Conference Grants

爱的交换Distributed to Division I conferences for programs that enhance officiating, compliance, minority opportunities and more.

$3.8M
Educational Programs

Supports varous educational services for members to help prepare student-athletes for life, including the Emerging Leaders Seminars and the Pathway Program.

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$58.4M
Other Association-Wide Expenses

Includes support for Association-wide legal services, communications and business insurance.

$44.8M
General and Administrative Expenses

Funds the day-to-day operations of the NCAA national office, including administrative and financial services, information technology and facilities management.

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Academic Distribution

Beginning in 2019-20, a portion of NCAA revenue will be distributed to Division I schools based on their student-athletes’ academic performance.

The distributions listed are recurring, and the information does not include any one-time distributions.

More on NCAA finances.

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*Figures are from the 2018-19 fiscal year and are unaudited. The distributions listed are recurring, and the information does not include any one-time distributions.

**Division II and Division III allocations are for program services and were calculated based on generally accepted accounting standards for Not-for-Profit entities. The expenses reported herein differ from amounts allocated to Division II and Division III under the Association’s federation rules.

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Did You Know?

Of 90 NCAA championships, only five (all in Division I) generate at least as much money as they cost to run: men’s basketball, men’s ice hockey, men’s lacrosse, wrestling and baseball.

The Division I College Football Playoff and bowl games are independently operated, and the NCAA does not receive revenue from these events.

爱的交换Beginning in 2019-20, a portion of NCAA revenue will be distributed to Division I schools based on their student-athletes’ academic performance.

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Where Does the Money Go?